Asparagus – A Nutritional Guide


It is interesting to note that there are old beliefs that asparagus could increase feelings of compassion and love, promote fertility, reduce menstrual cramping, and increase milk production in nursing mothers. In some countries they are also used as an aphrodisiac.

Nutritional values for 100 g

USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 13 (November 1999)

Nutrients Units Asparagus cooked
Water g 92
Energy kcal 24
Protein g 2.6
Total lipid (fat) g 0.3
Carbohydrate g 4.2
Fiber, total dietary g 1.6
Minerals
Calcium mg 20
Iron mg 0.7
Magnesium mg 10
Phosphorus mg 54
Potassium mg 160
Sodium mg 11
Zinc mg 0.4
Copper mg 0.1
Manganese mg 0.1
Selenium mcg 1.7
Vitamins
Vitamin C mg 11
B-1 (thiamin) mg 0.1
B-2 (riboflavin) mg 0.1
B-3 (niacin) mg 1
B-5 (pantothenic acid) mg 0.15
B-6 (pyridoxine) mg 0.1
Folate mcg 146
B-12 mcg 0
Vitamin A I.U 539
Vitamin A mcg RE 54
Vitamin E mcg ATE 0.4
Lipids
Fatty acids, saturated g 0.07
Fatty acids, monounsaturated g 0.01
Fatty acids, polyunsaturated g 0.136
Linoleic acid (18:2) g 0.129
Alpha-linolenic acid (18:3) g 0.007
Cholesterol mg 0

Asparagus, high in potassium, great for fibre, low in salt, and a terrific, healthy vegetable to grow, is a member of the lily family, which also includes onions, leeks and garlic.
They have been cultivated for more than 2000 years in South of Europe.There is nothing nicer than growing your own crop and taking it fresh to the table. It’s a perennial and it lives for up to 30 years.

Many people have never seen Asparagus growing but it is dead easy. Asparagus likes deep, friable, rich soil. If you’ve got heavy, clay soil, you’ll need to mound the plants up or dig in plenty of organic matter so that it becomes nice and well drained. They love soil with a pH of about 6.5 to 7. Dig a deep trench, about 75cm, for the long roots – the deeper the better. Then add organic matter.

Asparagus is very hungry and needs plenty of organic matter such as cow manure, sheep manure, or old chook poo. Scatter it thickly down the bottom of the trench because they will absolutely lap that up.

Health benefits
 – Asparagus are poor in calories and loaded with vitamins and minerals. They are a good source of folic acid, vitamin A, B vitamins and vitamin C.
They are also a fair source of calcium and fiber.
100 g of asparagus provide only 24 calories. The same amount provides 146 mg of vitamin B9 that is 1/3 of our recommended daily allowances.
Vitamin B9 is particularly important for pregnant women since not enough of it can cause the birth of a baby with spina bifida.

Asparagus have detoxifying and diuretic effects. Their fibers help us clean out our gastrointestinal tract. They also help the body get rid of the excess water.
Asparagus also contains the phytochemical glutathione, which has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties.

Some people notice a strong urine odor after eating asparagus. Asparagus contains a sulfur compound called a mercaptan which when broken down releases a funny scent.
The odor will disappear when the asparagus is completely digested and absorbed.

It has been reported by the US National Cancer Institute, that asparagus is the highest tested food containing glutathione, which is considered one of the body’s most potent anticarcinogens and antioxidants.

Several years ago, a man seeking asparagus for a friend who had cancer showed a photocopied copy of an article entitled, “Asparagus For Cancer” printed in Cancer News Journal, December 1979.

A number of favourable case histories are listed here:

Case No. 1 – A man with an almost hopeless case of Hodgkin’s disease (cancer of the lymph glands) who was completely incapacitated. Within 1 year of starting the asparagus therapy, his doctors were unable to detect any signs of cancer, and he was back on a schedule of strenuous exercise.

Case No. 2 – A successful businessman 68 years old who suffered from cancer of the bladder for 16 years. After years of medical treatments, including radiation without improvement, he went on asparagus. Within 3 months, examinations revealed that his bladder tumor had disappeared and that his kidneys were normal.

Case No. 3 – A man who had lung cancer. On March 5th 1971, he was put on the operating table where they found lung cancer so widely spread that it was inoperable. The surgeon sewed him up and declared his case hopeless. On April 5th he heard about the Asparagus therapy and immediately started taking it. By August, x-ray pictures revealed that all signs of the cancer had disappeared. . He is back at his regular business routine.

Case No. 4 – A woman who was troubled for a number of years with skin cancer. She finally developed different skin cancers which were diagnosed by the acting specialist as advanced. Within 3 months after starting on asparagus, her skin specialist said that her skin looked fine and no more skin lesions. This woman reported that the asparagus therapy also cured her kidney disease, which started in 1949. She had over 10 operations for kidney stones, and was receiving government disability payments for an inoperable, terminal, kidney condition.. She attributes the cure of this kidney trouble entirely to the asparagus.

Don’t be surprised at this result, as `The elements of materia medica’, edited in 1854 by a Professor at the University of Pennsylvania , stated that asparagus was used as a popular remedy for kidney stones. He even referred to experiments, in 1739, on the power of asparagus in dissolving stones. Note the dates!

We would have other case histories but the medical establishment has interfered with our obtaining some of the records. I am therefore appealing to readers to spread this good news and help us to gather a large number of case histories that will overwhelm the medical skeptics about this unbelievably simple and natural remedy.

For the treatment, asparagus should be cooked before using, and therefore canned asparagus is just as good as fresh.

To good health & happiness!

Paul Chong

A Chinese by Descent

An Australian by Consent

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