China’s New Sheraton Hotel

Paul Chong / Thursday, 20 November 2014 

Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.33.18 AM

When my wife & I first went to China in 1989, we were tremendously impressed with the standard & range of design with their five-star hotels in each of the cities we visited. In Beijing we stayed in Kunming Hotel, Shanghai was Sheraton Hotel with its fantastic indoor fountain which responded synchronising with the music played and I still recall the marvellous White Swan Hotel in Guangzhou. They even had a fleet of Mercedes for guests’ use.

That was 25 years ago when China was just opening up to welcome tourists. Shopping then was mainly confined to their Friendship Stores or roadside stores. Currency exchange was with some difficulties, besides not having much  shopping choices to attract the tourists’ dollars. Food was good, especially the hotel breakfast and all our travel was covered by air-conditioned coaches for sight-seeing.

China has since come a long way with its remarkable range of hotels. Today’s structures are mind-boggling & futuristic. Such is the presentation of the 27-storey “big glowing doughnut”

Sheraton Huzhou Hot Spring Resort that’s newly established near to Shanghai.

Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.35.34 AM Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.37.40 AM Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.36.05 AM

 

Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.32.45 AM


Screen shot 2014-11-19 at 12.34.43 AM

Advertisements

China Is Hong Kong’s Future

Paul Chong/24 October 2014

hong-kong-protestHong Kong – Occupy Central

Don’t be British stooges nor be the “running dogs” of US

Hong Kongers, Hong Kongese or Hongkees, whatever name the people in Hong Kong like to be known as, are like “frogs in the well” . . . so confined & restricted in their outlook that they don’t know the realities of life in the outside world. For far too long (156 stolen years) they have been “kidnapped, forcibly occupied, indoctrinated & influenced by an evil imperial regime whose domination is no less evil in India, Malaysia & other colonies.

You know the world would have been a better place now if Adam & Eve hadn’t failed to disobey God about eating the forbidden fruit. Western media are more cunning & devious than the Devil in controlling the hearts & minds of people. It is not the object of this writing to detail their acts, but the diagram below demonstrates clearly the whole propaganda machine at the disposal of US & its puppets:

The Propaganda Macine

For example, Hana Alberts, an editor & writer for Forbes & alternatively for the weekly HK Magazine, must have got rocks in his head when he wrote in his article “We Are All Hongkongers” of a “borrowed place living on borrowed time”. This is clearly a journalistic lie & propaganda of western media to create instability & further insinuating with the question of constantly ”struggling with identity issues”.

If the people in Hong Kong know their root & genealogy, they will understand that they are Chinese . . . yes, nothing but Chinese with ancestral ties in Mainland China. A large part of them are Cantonese, having come from the province of Guangdong. The national language medium of Mandarin is understood by most in Hong Kong. There’s no question of “identity issues.” Before taking flight, you must fundamentally know your root.

From the Bible, Jeremiah 13:23 (King James Version):

“Can the Ethiopian change his skin, or the leopard his spots? then may ye also do good, that are accustomed to do evil.” This clearly illustrates the notion that things cannot change their innate nature.

Hong Kong was & is part of China. It was the British who usurped Hong Kong through an unfair treaty. Britain was evil & avaricious to gain a foothold onto China and for 156 years ruled Hong Kong without democracy or free speech. In fact, the Chinese were treated as “dogs”. There were privileged clubs & designated areas where “Chinese & Dogs Are Prohibited”. Humiliation suffered by the people then may not be known by the present generation of Hong Kong. Many would not have known of the humiliation of opium addiction because of the evil trading of the British East India Company. Hopefully, the Chinese in Hong Kong are no longer “sick” oblivious & still craving for opium deviously introduced by the British.

There is no question of “borrowed time”. Hong Kong is China’s. Its sovereignty lies with China. With due respect & honour, peace & goodwill, no other western power should intervene or interfere with China’s internal affairs. Of course, outside forces are just waiting for things to go wrong, but China is no longer the “sick man” of Asia (all because of opium).

China is changing. It is not perfect, but will get better & better with the passage of time. No Utopia or Shangrila exists in this world. In fact, no visitor to Hong Kong or China can visibly fathom or see any evidence of “communistic characteristics”. Under the “one country two systems”, the Rule of Law, free speech & the right to protest are protected . . . something which the Hong Kong people never had under the British. The idea of any kind of democracy was first introduced by the Chinese government with adopting the Basic Law in 1990 including the commitment that in 2017 the territory’s chief executive would be elected by universal suffrage. It also spelt out the nomination of candidates would be a matter for a nominating committee. Democracy activists claim that China’s plans will allow it to screen out the candidates it doesn’t want.

Hong Kong people are forgetting that all its past 28 governors were appointed by the British government & was ruled from 6,000 miles away in London. All colonies failed to realise the suffering of classical exploitation with “drainage” trade benefiting the colonial masters. 

There are complicated problems that require great long term insight & administrative skills, so decisions cannot be hastily made nor can it be trusted to the average Chinese citizens. The Chinese system of governance/democracy has won favour with lots of global academicians. Need I say more . . . results of economic growth & development in the last thirty years speak louder than words. Hong Kong no doubt has had its fair share.

I fail to understand the Hong Kong people’s resentment at mainlander’s success & the extent of looking down on the mainlanders – their own kind. This is really deplorable.

It’s a civil disobedience movement which began in Hong Kong on September 28, 2014. It calls for thousands of protestors to block roads & paralyse Hong Kong’s financial district if the Beijing & Hong Kong governments do not agree to implement universal suffrage for the chief executive election 2017 & the Legislative Council elections in 2020 according to “international standards.” The movement was initiated by Benny Tai Yiu-ting, an associate professor of law at the University of Hong Kong, in January 2013.

Millions have been lost since this Occupy Central started. Occupy Central was to be carried out with Love & Peace. But in exercising their rights to assemble, they are encroaching upon the rights of others. It’s unlawful when you deprive others of their livelihood such as the taxi drivers, bus drivers, business operators & others. This upheaval is causing Hong Kong to lose its role as the gateway to China

The Law has been more than patient. In the 17 years since the return, China has, whatever the gainsayers might suggest, overwhelmingly honoured its commitment to the principle of “one country, two systems”. The same mus understandably be shown by these young protestors. The golden era enjoyed by the Hong Kong people is not result of the British but of the Chinese.

Hong Kong got rich because of China. It fed an ego & an arrogant attitude when the Hong Kong Chinese came to enjoy a much higher standard of living than the mainlanders. This resulted in their arrogance of looking down on the mainlanders as being inferior peasants, poor, ignorant & uncouth. To look down on your own kind is unforgivable and they want to be associated with the westerners because of material wealth or status.

Shanghai, Shenzhen & Guangzhou would soon surpass Hong Kong. Initially, China might have needed Hong Kong but it is not really as true now. Hong Kong now would be in trouble without China. Since the return of Hong Kong China has given more & more without taking even the taxes. Hong Kong Chinese are enjoying a life style all mainlanders would be envy of.

You are urged to stop monkeying around. All things considered, stop being idealistic but be pragmatic. Hong Kong is the “Pearl of the Orient”. Don’t spoil it. China is proud of it & would do no harm to it. China is Hong Kong’s future.

UPDATE

AS ON 4  NOVEMBER 2014

HK RESIDENTS COLLECTED

1,835,793 SIGNATURES

AGAINST THE PROTESTORS

SOURCE: CCTV

oKong governments do not agre

US Now Admits it is Funding “Occupy Central” in Hong Kong (The Washington Post 1/10/2014)

http://www.globalresearch.ca/us-now-admits-it-is-funding-occupy-central-in

U P D A T E  –  AS ON 2 DECEMBER 2014

WireAP_52dbf924d78c448ab494013c9b00e2f4_16x9_992Three protest leaders, from left, Chan Kin-man, Benny Tai Yiu-ting and Chu Yiu-ming, attend a news conference in Hong Kong Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014 as they announce that they will surrender to police. Three protest leaders in Hong Kong – two professors and a pastor – are calling for an end to street demonstrations to prevent violence and take the campaign for democratic reforms to a new stage. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung) Close The Associated Press

Three student leaders had been arrested prior to this. 

Why China Rises and the US Falls

PC/Friday, 20 September 2013

images

The Chinese have always been widely known to be most assiduous in their economic pursuit. From having the great capacity for work, surviving in the most adverse economic conditions, suffering & enduring, they are also very employable. They contributed much to the building of railway in America. Totally reliable & trust worthy, that’s who & what they are.

Most importantly you’ve got to remember they boast of an unbroken civilisation of some 5000 years unequal by any! – P Chong

Herein  we clearly see the dichotomy that distinguishes one from the other . . .

Source of Slides/Pictures Unknown:

Chinese women army greater in number than the whole of US population!

The American are required to be asleep in order to realise their American Dream.

America needs to really wake up and stop whining. It needs to fix the social political system and economic system. The only way to compete with China over the long term is to have its “EDUCATION” right.

Education is the secret to China’s long-term sustainable rise. Recently, America was shocked to see how much the American students are falling behind on science, mathematics and writing, while Chinese students excel in those three on international tests. Many in the US realize the challenge but also quickly point out that those Chinese students were from the developed Shanghai area and they have more money and better facilities. Wrong!!! students in Shanghai or Beijing are known to be lousy students who perform a lot worse than those from poorer areas. They have much lower college entrance thresholds, and normally they cannot enter the top Chinese universities.

This shows how wrong the US is: it looks at education only by money . . . while it is the will and love of knowledge that make a people worship education. (See BBC Chinese School, or http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8cyb0. ..)

Education can make a turnaround within 10-20 years in a person’s life, and within 20-50 years in a nation’s lot.

America was in shock when it learned that China produced a stealth fighter, the fastest super-computer, longest highway system, longest high-speed rail system . . . all happened within a number of years since its reform started in 1979 when China was a lot worse than Ethiopia or Ecuador.

Education aside, let’s take a look at the other factors: 

Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 5.56.46 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 5.57.36 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.00.54 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.01.20 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.01.42 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.01.54 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.47.39 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.52.00 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.56.25 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.57.14 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.58.01 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.58.20 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.58.47 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.59.10 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.59.20 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 6.59.53 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.01.01 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.01.16 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.01.39 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.02.00 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.02.18 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.02.32 PM Screen shot 2013-07-25 at 7.02.43 PM

 A VERY YOUNG worker in China . . .

only 5 years old undertaking a man’s job!                                   

Click Below/Copy & Paste:

http://static.video.qq.com/TPout.swf?auto=1&vid=r010673xh67

A Brief Look at China’s Government – Stuff You Thought You Knew, But Didn’t

Image

Looking at the western democratic governments these last 30 years, more negatives than positives are apparent. The latest to add to the fold of turmoil & instability is Egypt – an ancient civilisation that once held its glory & pride. US, so claimed as the master of western democracy, in its attempt to dominate & impose its system of government on others has itself been drowning in the ocean of economic woes & other problems.

In the article below, the Shanghai Chinese author presents to us the meritocratic system of the Chinese government that ignorant critics are quick to condemn. Knowing the truth will breed better understanding of the merits & the way the system works.

Deng Xiaoping referred to it as “capitalism with Chinese characteristics.”

Here’s to the Most Vocal & Unforgivably Uninformed . . . who will begin to understand why China has emerged as a major political and economic power on the international stage, and the pace of this growth has been astonishing.

China is like having the longest root of capitalism to capitalism. Its meritocracy is certainly a good or even better alternative to US imperial democracy.

Article by 龙信明 (Lung XinMing)

http://www.bearcanada.com/china/brieflookatchinasgovernment.html

A Bit of Background 

You probably already know that China has a system of annual university entrance examinations, taken by about 10 million students each year. This set of examinations is quite stiff and perhaps even harsh, covering many subjects and occupying three days. The tests require broad understanding, deep knowledge and high intelligence, if one is to do well. Any student whose results are near the top of the list, is in the top 2% or 3% of a pool of 1.5 billion people. 

Getting a high mark qualifies a student to enter one of the top two or three universities, which will virtually guarantee a great job on graduation, a high salary and a good life. Moving down the scale of results, the prospects become increasingly meager. You may not know that China also has a system of bar examinations which every graduate lawyer must pass in order to practice law in China. For these, we can bypass “stiff” and “harsh” and go directly to “severe”. Out of about 250,000 graduate lawyers who sit for the exam, only about 20,000 will pass and obtain qualifications to actually be a practicing lawyer in China. Once again, the exams require broad understanding of all matters legal, deep knowledge of the laws, and high intelligence. So if you happen to meet a Chinese lawyer, you can be assured you are dealing with someone from top 1% or 2% of a pool of 1.5 billion people.

I mention these two items only to introduce a third – the Civil Service Examinations.

Becoming a Government Official in China

The Imperial examinations were designed many centuries ago to select the best administrative officials for the state’s bureaucracy. They lasted as long as 72 hours, and required a great depth and breadth of knowledge to pass. It was an eminently fair system in that the exam itself had no qualifications. Almost anyone, even from the least educated family in the poorest town, could sit the exam and, if that person did well enough, he or she could join the civil service and potentially rise to the top. The modern civil service examination system evolved from the imperial one, and today, millions of graduates write these each year. And for these, we can bypass “severe” and go directly to “brutal”, because out of the millions of candidates only about 10,000 will get a pass.

The Chinese Have High Standards

And that pass doesn’t get you a job; all it gets you is an interview. If you meet anyone in China’s central government, you can rest assured you are speaking to a person who is not only exceptionally well educated and knowledgeable on a broad range of national issues but is in the top 1% of a pool of 1.5 billion people. Moreover, China’s government officials are all highly-educated and trained engineers, economists, sociologists, scientists, often at a Ph.D. level. 

Contrast this with the Western system where most politicians are either lawyers or those with no useful education. We should also remember that the Chinese generally score about 10% higher on standard IQ tests than do Caucasian Westerners, and couple this with the Chinese process of weeding out all but the top 1% from consideration. When you add further the prospect of doing your weeding from a pool of 1.5 billion people, you might expect China’s Central Government to be rather better qualified than that of most other countries. And it is. 

The point of this is to bring your attention to the disparity between the quality of ‘politicians’ in Western countries and China’s government officials. The discrepancy is so vast that comparisons are largely meaningless.

Friends, Family and ‘Connections’ 

There are some who will tell you that family connections in China can produce a government job for some favored son, a claim that may be true in some places though extremely difficult at the national level. But no amount of ‘connections’ will move you into senior positions or to the top of decision-making power; those places are reserved for persons of deep experience and proven ability. “Of the Communist Party’s highest ruling body, the 25-member Politburo, only seven came from any background of wealth or power. The rest of them, including the president and the prime minister, were from ordinary backgrounds with no special advantages. They worked and competed all the way to the top. 

In the larger Central Committee, those with privileged backgrounds are even scarcer. A visit to any top university campus in China would make it obvious to anyone that the Communist Party continues to attract the best and the brightest of the country’s youth. In fact, China’s Communist Party may be one of the most meritocratic and upwardly mobile major political organizations in the world – far more meritocratic than the ruling elites of most Western countries and the vast majority of developing countries.” 

(1)Choosing the Nation’s Leaders 

Consider how it would be if a Western country could identify and assemble the 300 best, brightest, wisest, most educated and experienced people in the nation, men and women of great proportion whose depth and breadth of knowledge and ability were the envy of all. And consider this group selecting some to be their leaders – the Prime Minister, President, Cabinet members. That’s essentially how China does it. On what basis can we tell them their way is wrong? For Westerners to refer to this as a dictatorship is offensive and merely stupid. 

In contradistinction to the West, China’s system cannot produce incompetence at the top because in a population of 1.5 billion people there are just too many available candidates with stunningly impressive credentials. In China’s system, leaders and officials are evaluated and selected by their peers, not by the unqualified and uninformed ‘man in the street’. It is the only government system in the world that ensures competence at the top, because these people are evaluated on the basis of real credentials rather than public popularity or TV charisma. 

Leaders are selected on the basis of true leadership, on their ability to bring together all factions, to create harmony and consensus on their realisable vision for the country, to wisely control and direct the military. They have a firm understanding of the economy, of the nation, of society and its problems and the best way to meet them. They are not only admired and respected by their peers, but able to draw others to them in order to form that consensus and harmony that are so desirable and necessary for stability.

Education and Training of Government Officials 

There is another factor to consider, that of education and training. In the West, senior government officials – the politicians – are seldom renowned for competence or even intelligence. For the Western politicians who who exercise all the real decision power to shape a country, there is no education or training available or required. It is all a kind of ‘earn while you learn’ system. 

In China, those who will become the senior officials and civil servants have entered a lifelong career in a formidable meritocracy where promotion and responsibility can be obtained only by demonstrated ability. Once in the system, the education and training are never-ending. The system is generally well understood within China, and it meshes well with Chinese culture and tradition as well as conforming to the Chinese psyche in their Confucian overview and their desire for social order and (yes) harmony. The Western world understands this dimly, if at all, and inevitably forms incorrect and often absurd conclusions about China and its government – especially the mindless references to China being a ‘dictatorship’.

The President Goes to School 

The Central Party School in Beijing has been called the most mysterious school in China, and is like no other university or college anywhere. Here is a link to an article on this university that will give you more information: Read here. At various times, the most promising young and middle-aged officials attend this university for up to a year at a time, to expand their knowledge and understanding of all issues relating to China. 

The Headmaster of the school is often the President of China, and the lecturers are usually foreign dignitaries, high-level officials, and renowned experts on everything from economics and international finance to social policy, foreign policy, industrial policy and even military matters. The cornerstone of the school’s educational policy is that everything is on the table. There are no forbidden topics, and even reactionary, revolutionary or just plain whacky positions are discussed, analysed and debated to resolution. All manner of planning, problems, solutions, alternatives, will be discussed, examined, debated, explained, with any number of prominent experts available as reference material. 

When these sessions are completed, all students will have an MBA-level or better appreciation of the entire subject. And this is only one subject of many they will encounter. When you consider that these officials entered the government with an already high level of education, and with an already demonstrated broad level of understanding and exceptional intelligence, these additional layers of training and education cannot help but produce an impressive level of overall knowledge and ability throughout the government. Nothing like this system exists in the West, which is why senior civil servants in most Western countries often look on their leader-politicians with a mixture of disdain and contempt for their lack of knowledge and ability.

The Functioning of China’s Government 

Few Westerners have bothered to learn even the simple basics about the form of China’s government, preferring instead to parrot foolish Western supremacist nonsense about China being a dictatorship. China has a one-party government. 

If you listen to Western ideologues, you will be told this is heresy in the eyes of the Gods of Government in 6 galaxies. But it is no such thing, and contains enormous advantages. Here, there is no forced separation of officials on the basis of political ideology. China’s entire social spectrum is represented in government in the same way as in Chinese – or any other – society.

There is no partisan in-fighting. 

Unlike the West, China’s system looks for consensus rather than conflict. Government decision-making is not a sport where my team has to win. It is simply a group of people with various viewpoints working together to obtain a consensus for policy and action for the overall good of their nation. From everything I have seen, China’s one-party system is superior in many respects to what we have in the West. This is what has produced a growth rate of over 10% per year for 30 years, compared to perhaps 3% in the West. And how can it be otherwise? 

China’s government doesn’t waste its time fighting juvenile ideological battles with ‘opposition parties’, but instead everyone gets down to the business of doing the best for the nation. China’s government leaders manage by consensus, not by power, authority or bullying. It is their job to create agreement and unified willing participation in the country’s policies to meet its goals. At this level there are no children, and there is no one person with the power to start a war just because he doesn’t like someone, or who is free to alienate other nations on the basis of some blind personal ideology.

Lobbying and Influence 

In China, many people and industries are permitted to present their case, but private or short-term interests will not emerge victorious in this system. Your proposals will receive support and will succeed only if they are to the long-term benefit of the country as a whole – the greatest good for the nation and for the population. That’s how it works. In the US system, corporations control the government; in China’s, the government controls the corporations. And those firms may often not get their way even if they are government-owned. Consider the introduction of HSR (High-Speed Rail) in China. Some Chinese airlines (especially the state-owned ones), complained like hell, and with good reason, about the inauguration of HSR. Some have had to dramatically scale back their flight schedules because many people prefer the train. But the wide HSR network was seen as being in the best interests of the entire country and it went ahead. Read more here. That is also why China has the best (and cheapest) mobile phone system in the world. Read more here.

The “Loyal Opposition” 

China’s system also has an ‘opposition’, but this body has two major differences from Western governments. Also, it functions intelligently, so let’s make that three major differences. First, it does not function to ‘oppose’ but rather to consult. This body is charged with the responsibility to consider not only the government’s directions and policies but also to devise alternatives and make recommendations. And the government must by law consider and respond to all these consultations – which it does. Second, this opposition group are not the marginalised ‘losers’ as in the Western systems but a second tier of extremely competent people who were not selected to the top governing positions. And, rather than lose all this expertise, this secondary group was created to contribute to the development of their country.

The Success of Government 

Probably the greatest deciding factor permitting China’s rise is the political environment. China’s one-party government is in for the long term; it makes no short-term decisions for the sake of political expediency. China makes decisions for the good of the whole country and, having made them, implements them. 

There is no partisanship, no lobbyists, no special interest groups that skew these important decisions and rob the population of what they might have had. 

The benefits of this system can be seen in its results. China has already far surpassed the undeveloped nations that adopted Western democratic governments,and likely has a brighter future than most of them. Why is the West so eager for China to abandon a centuries-old system that clearly works well, in favor of one designed for ideological battles, conflicts and shouting wars? Many foreign observers are now, (finally) admitting openly that China’s form of government exhibits signs of superiority over Western systems, and that it is largely responsible for China’s efficiency, for its rapid development, and for its speed of response in areas like the Sichuan earthquake and the planning and deployment of its high-speed train system. 

The “Free World” could learn a lot from China’s government system. It works, beautifully. It has transformed the economy and brought hundreds of millions out of poverty. It has put men into space, built the world’s fastest trains, the longest undersea tunnels, the world’s longest bridges, the largest dams. 

It is rapidly creating the world’s largest genuine middle class. And it’s hardly begun. (1) From an article by Eric Li.

Ordos City, Inner Mongolia, China – New but Deserted

 See the new City of Ordos in Inner Mongolia, China where the crowning of Miss World 2012 took place. It was won by

Miss China Yu Lien Xia.

Look at the architecture of the new hall and stadium which is comparable with the best in the world.

Ordos in Inner Mongolia with the second highest GDP after Shanghai has its wealth through the vast resources of coal exploitation.

The government has built an entire new Ordos City.

All buildings virtually sold but unoccupied – held mainly by investors for investment. In China, nobody ever loses in real estate, at least not on a consistent basis. So they keep on building & investors with cash to spare to spare keep on buying.

Nobody has yet moved into the new City of Ordos, but investors are waiting patiently . . . only a question of time, they believe.

At present, of course there isn’t any existing economic activity, except some 30 Km away in the old city of Ordos.

With characteristic & unique style of architecture, reflecting the Mongolian past traditional life, Ordos City will prove to be a great tourist attraction in the days ahead.

There are also monuments dedicated to the great Genghis Khan, the historical conquerer in the era gone by.

Melissa Chan of Aljajeera in 2009 made this report, which as shown below in YouTube video:

Mongolians traditionally used to live in tents & will need time to get used to modern living.

Slideshow of Images of Futuristic Buildings  

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This is nothing compared to what is projected ahead! 

By 2025, China will build TEN New York-sized cities.

The scale and pace of China’s urbanization promises to continue at an unprecedented rate. If current trends hold, China’s urban population will expand from 572 million in 2005 to 926 million in 2025 and hit the one billion mark by 2030. In 20 years,China’s cities will have added 350 million people, more than the entire population of the United States today. By 2025, China will have 219 cities with more than one million inhabitants, compared with 35 in Europe today and 24 cities with more than five million people. Also, 40 billion square meters of floor space will be built – in five million buildings. 50,000 of these buildings could be skyscrapers – the equivalent of ten New York Cities.

So what’s happening in Ordos is rather insignificant when compared with the greater picture of China!

“Live” Meeting-Up With Celebrities at Madame Tussauds

S

Meet the celebrities of your choice up-close & personal!

 Prince William & Kate Middleton

Madame Tussauds London, the original, is a major tourist attraction located in Central London, housed in the former London Planetarium. It is famous for recreating famous people, or celebrities, in wax.

 

Anna Maria Tussaud was an artist known for her wax sculptures and Madame Tussaud’s, the wax museum, in London is attributed to her memory.

Now, this tourist attraction for celebrity wax figures in London is everywhere – New York, Washington, Las Vegas, Amsterdam, Berlin, Shanghai, and Sydney.

Welcome to Madame Tussauds located in Times Square New York, USA. Get up close and personal with your favorite celebrity wax figures at the world famous tourist attraction.

Whom do you like to meet? Political leaders, historical figures, pop stars, cultural figures, TV stars, sports stars, world leaders, Hollywood stars – you’ll find them all at the wax museum.

Here are some of the celebrities we met (Slideshow):

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

China Pavilion (Legacy of Shanghai’s 2010 World Expo)

Long after Shanghai’s 2010 World Expo has gone, the China Pavilion still stands magnificently. This striking immense red structure is the first building you’ll see upon entering the Expo Park & the last one upon leaving.

It’s certainly reflecting the theme: Better City, Better Life.

It’s China’s gift to the people & to the world.

Play YouTube Video

Timelapse and video shot on Canon 7d and GoPro Hero HD 
for SeeChina.org.cn and Danwei.tv 
by Janek Zdarski

The main structure of the China Pavilion, “The Crown of the East,” has a distinctive roof, made of traditional dougong or brackets, which date back more than 2,000 years. The dougong style features wooden brackets fixed layer upon layer between the top of a column and a crossbeam. This unique structural component of interlocking wooden brackets is one of the most important elements in traditional Chinese architecture. Dougong was widely used in the Spring and Autumn Period (770 BC-467 BC).”

The contour design of the pavilion is based on the concept of “Oriental Crown, Splendid China, Ample Barn, and Rich People,” to express the spirit and disposition of Chinese culture. The pavilion has a core exhibition area on the top floor, an experience area on the second and a functional area on the first. China’s achievements in urban development from ancient to modern times are shown as the core theme of the pavilion.

The China Pavilion sits right next to the Expo Boulevard and the Sun Valleys, which act as the center of the Expo. (Slideshow Below)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Painted the same red as the Forbidden City, the China Pavilion consists of four pillars with 6 floors expanding out and up. The 30 meter high roof is constructed from 56 wooden brackets (dougong), which represent the 56 minority ethnic groups of China. Additionally, nine folded scripts engraved on the surface of the building list the short names of China’s provinces.

Designed by He Jingtang, the director of the Architectural Academy of the South China University of Technology, “the Pavilion includes many energy saving technologies. The exterior of the structure offers a temperature buffer zone and natural ventilation for the interior, and the inverted shape of the pavilion acts as shading for entire building as well as the courtyard below. The roof of the structure includes eco-friendly landscaping and harvests rainwater.”

The China Pavilion, also known as the Oriental Crown, represents the spirit of the people of China and is one of the 5 permanent green buildings on the Expo Park converted into a national history museum.

Video hosted by Nancy Merrill below showing the background to its construction:

<!– AddThis Button BEGIN –>
<div class=”addthis_toolbox addthis_default_style “>
<a class=”addthis_button_preferred_1″></a>
<a class=”addthis_button_preferred_2″></a>
<a class=”addthis_button_preferred_3″></a>
<a class=”addthis_button_preferred_4″></a>
<a class=”addthis_button_compact”></a>
<a class=”addthis_counter addthis_bubble_style”></a>
</div>
// <![CDATA[
javascript” src=”http://s7.addthis.com/js/250/addthis_widget.js#pubid=xa-4fa8ad654a8feb20″&gt;
// ]]>
<!– AddThis Button END –>

China’s First Lady-in-Waiting

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Peng Liyuan, celebrated folk singer of China

Jackie Kennedy got to be US First Lady through her camera.

Peng Liyuan, the celebrated folk singer, is becoming China’s First Lady through her microphone. Whereas Jackie was a lesser known figure prior to her meeting up with President John Kennedy, Peng Liyuan is a celebrity in her own right. She’s glamorous, cultured, well educated with a master degree in folk music. It was her voice & singing that first wooed the heart of Xi Jinping, the next President-to-be of China.

She’s totally different from all the First Ladies you’ve ever known or heard of.

She’s China’s own & absolutely exceptional.

 

Until 2007, when Xi Jinping was promoted to top Party leader in Shanghai, his wife Peng Liyuan was a fixture at government-sponsored events, CCTV Festival Extravaganza which are the country’s largest and most conspicuously events watched by hundreds of millions. Ms. Peng was admired as much for her soprano vocal as she was for the way she exercised them in “shimmering chiffon gowns, with crimson-glossed lips.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Her profile is summarily mentioned here:

* Ms. Peng, whose name means “Beauteous Beauty” in Chinese, has been known as a faithful “soldier of the arts.” in a state news agency profile page.

* She is China’s first folk-song master-degree recipient; youngest civilian general in the Chinese army’s musical troupe; honorary professor at Shanghai Teachers’ College.

* Her travels include trips to “various revolutionary districts, impoverished mountainous regions, and minority neighborhoods.”

* Ms. Peng has also been put forward as a celebrity ambassador for issues of public health including AIDS,requiring her to lobby foreign governments to help cure such dreadful disease & others.

* A friend and photographer once took pity on young Peng and snapped her first picture, immortalizing the young star for whom camera lenses would, soon enough, become a constant companion. That was late 60s or early 70s when she first set her eyes on a camera.

* The glamorous starlet initially dismissed the future President as a xiang ba lao, a country bumpkin with coarse skin who wasn’t much to look at, an impression that isn’t entirely unfounded, according to an article in the Zhanjiang Evening News in 2007 that was widely copied on the Chinese Internet but has since been mostly deleted.

* Even her final verdict came with honest qualifiers: “Isn’t [he] the one I’ve been looking for? Unsophisticated but really intelligent.” As for Mr. Xi, he was quoted as telling her that he knew she would be his wife within 40 minutes of meeting her.

She has also described how she was introduced to Mr. Xi through a mutual friend when he was working as the deputy mayor of the eastern port of Xiamen in 1986. Mr. Xi had been married once before, to the daughter of a Chinese ambassador to Britain, but that only lasted three years when her own desire to study abroad overtook Xi’s political ambition, and they had no children.

Political analysts say Ms. Peng, who is now 49, is already helping to bolster and soften Mr. Xi’s public image in a country that, stimulated by social media, has become increasingly hungry for news about its leaders and their personal lives.

She has already broken the mould by talking about her relationship with Mr. Xi prior to his promotion to the Politburo Standing Committee in 2007.

When he comes home, I’ve never thought of it as though there’s some leader in the house,” she once told a state-run magazine. “In my eyes, he’s just my husband. When I get home, he doesn’t think of me as some famous star. In his eyes, I’m simply his wife.”

She has however taken a few tentative steps into the limelight again in recent years, fuelling expectations that she will be the first spouse of a Chinese leader to play an active “first lady” role after her husband takes power in October or November.

Last year, as mentioned, she became a Goodwill Ambassador for Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS for the World Health Organization – a job that requires her to help lobby governments around the world to take action to prevent and cure the two diseases.

And after the devastating earthquake in Wenchuan, Sichuan Province in May 2008, she staged special performances in affected areas and announced publicly that their daughter, Xi Mingze, who was then 16 at the time, had volunteered to help relief efforts – another first for a Chinese leader’s family.

Come this fall, when Peng’s First Lady identity eclipses her superstar status, we must await to see the transformation in our dazzling star. Would she remain a noble, dignified mother only & a faithful wife?

The question is “Will she do anything exceptional to further boost the image of China? Or like her three other predecessors retreat into the background & remain a mystery?”

China’s Cultural Showcase to the World

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It was an exquisite cultural dance performance at the close of Shanghai Expo – a show to match any show on earth.

It seems that China never stops to amaze the world!

  • Angels flying high & low in graceful formation – all seem so natural without any visible strings attached

  • Musicians . . . the violinists . . . mandolinists, all appearing to be sitting on air

  • Musical bells all hanging from mid-air – no strings attached

  • Magical colours & lights filling the whole stage

Music, images and Performing Art Diversity and Fusion

Watch & Enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/watch_popup?v=6HfDeTVpinU&vq=medium

Music by Zhao Guang

Leading Dancer: Huang Doudou

Accompanied by Shanghai Song and Dance Ensemble

Shanghai Oriental City Dance Troupe et al

Shenzhen – The Voice of Innovation In Mainland China

BY P Chong       8 November 2011

Shenzhen in the early 1990s  

Present Shenzhen
Shenzhen as it Now

Shenzhen was voted by Forbes China in 2010 as the most innovative city in mainland China. It virtually started from scratch.

Shenzhen in the 1970s was but a small village. Its metropolitan cityscape is the result of the vibrant economic growth made possible by rapid foreign investment since the institution of the policy of “reform and opening” establishment of the SEZ in the late 1970s. Both Chinese and foreign nationals have invested billions in the Shenzhen SEZ. More than US$30 billion in foreign investment has gone into both foreign-owned and joint ventures, at first mainly in manufacturing but more recently in the service industries as well. Shenzhen is now reputedly one of the fastest-growing cities in the world.

Being the southern mainland China’s major financial centre, Shenzhen is home to the Shenzhen Stock Exchange as well as the headquarters of numerous high-tech companies. Shenzhen is also the third-busiest container port in China, after Shanghai and Hong Kong.

Shenzhen/Suzhou/Shanghai

Shenzhen continued to top the list of the most innovative cities on the Chinese mainland this year, followed by Suzhou and Shanghai.

Shenzhen continued to top the list of the most innovative cities on the Chinese mainland this year, followed by Suzhou and Shanghai, according to the latest list of the 25 Chinese mainland cities with the strongest innovation capabilities released Monday by Forbes China.

Forbes China’s survey covered 129 mainland cities:

  • with the municipal GDP of above RMB 43.6 billion yuan (US$6.84 billion) in 2010

  • also the number of patents newly applied for (per capita and total number)

  • the proportion of sci-tech expenses to local fiscal expenditures (including expenses on trial development of new products, intermediate experiment allocations and subsidies for important scientific research projects).

 In 2010, the value-added of Shenzhen’s high-tech industry rose 17.1 percent to RMB 305.9 billion yuan, while the total output value of high-tech products made in Shenzhen hit about RMB 1.02 trillion yuan, with 60.1 percent contributed by products with independent intellectual property rights.

The Yangtze River Delta region retained its predominant status this year, with 15 cities edging into the list. Jiangsu province alone has 11 cities included. Five cities from the Pearl River Delta moved up into the list, while no cities from Western China appeared there.

Statistics show that China’s smaller cities are amazingly eye-catching for their innovation capabilities with more than half cities on the list being county-level and prefecture-level cities. Of the top ten, there are 4 county-level cities: Wujiang, Kunshan, Changshu and Zhangjiagang.

Source: China.org.cn